Using the Tao of Twitter for Book Marketing

The Tao of Twitter
Photo from Amazon

If you’re on Twitter, you know there are a lot of people there. And it’s pretty easy to make connections; people will seem to follow you out of the blue. Of course, many times they are just hoping you will follow them back. Then there’s all of that clutter. How do you stand out in the noise and actually connect with readers? The Tao of Twitter by Mark Schaefer can help you with that.

The Tao of Twitter not only gives general advice about using Twitter, but also provides an action plan to get Twitterized in 20 minutes a day. You can easily apply this advice to book marketing.

On page 20, Mark says, “Twitter is about sharing content for humans, not search engines.” He advises linking to your blog posts so readers can find out more and see that you know what you’re talking about. He pushes “authentic helpfulness” above all, providing several examples of beneficial connections he’s made thanks to Twitter.

As the title suggests, Mark breaks his advice down into to three main “tao”s. Number one is to find your tribe. You can do this for your book by using keywords and phrases related to your book in your profile description. For example, if I had a strictly author Twitter account for Taming the Twisted, I would put something like “Author of American historical fiction set in the Midwest on the Mississippi River involving murder and romance.”

Tao number two is to offer meaningful content, which means sharing and posting things that are helpful, entertaining, enlightening, interesting, or a combination. Do not just post ads to your own books. It’s not that you can never talk about your book on Twitter, but follow something like a 10:1 rule: for every promotional tweet, post ten helpful, entertaining, etc. tweets.

Tao number three encourages authentic helpfulness. When you’re using Twitter, constantly be thinking about how you can provide value, right there on Twitter, but also offline and via other online avenues. For authors, think about how you can be authentically helpful to your readers.

Not only can you apply these three “tao”s to book marketing, you can also easily adapt Mark’s 20-minute daily plan. If you’re a beginner, for the first couple of months you’re on Twitter, spend 20 minutes each day tweeting an authentically helpful post once each day, finding and following people, and reading and responding to tweets. Continue this practice until you have “20 relevant followers.”

Once you have 20 or so followers, break up your 20 minutes throughout the day, retweeting things as they resonate with you and adding your own comments where you have real insight. You can also create lists to categorize those you’re following to make it easier to do this. Continue to delve into authentic helpfulness by retweeting, answering questions, and offering help. You can use Tweetdeck or Hootsuite to spread out your tweets and get the mobile app so you can work on Twitter during down times.

Mark classifies you as a pro when you’ve hit 400 or more followers. When you get there, keep doing what your doing, continually striving for authentic helpfulness, experimenting, and building your lists.

These are the basics of The Tao of Twitter. The book also contains other helpful advice and tips, such as holding Twitter chats and ways to @mention to make sure your tweets are seen. To find that out, you’ll have to check out the book yourself.

Source: Schaefer, Mark. 2014. The Tao of Twitter, Revised and Expanded New Edition: Changing Your Life and Business 140 Characters at a Time. McGraw-Hill Education.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *