THINK LIKE A BOOK STAR FOR BOOK MARKETING

Think Like a Rock Star (photo from Amazon)
Think Like a Rock Star (photo from Amazon)

Being famous. People waiting in line for hours to buy your book and get your loopy signature on its title page. Readers scrambling to get your next copy. Volumes of pre-orders. Admit it, as an author, deep down, that’s your ultimate dream, isn’t it? Don’t tell me you’ve not been the least bit envious of J.K. Rowling or Stephen King? (My hand is sheepishly raised.) Don’t get me wrong – I’m happy for all those book-star successes, but there is that teeny, tiny bit of bitterness.

Think Like a Rock Star by Mack Collier is a general marketing book with the subtitle, How to Create Social Media and Marketing Strategies that Turn Customers Into Fans. (I bought it at Brand Driven Digital’s 2014 Social Brand Forum.) The book studies rock stars and provides helpful advice about cultivating fan relationships with any brand. As an author deep in book marketing, your brand is more similar to a rock star’s than many products.

The book is good; not preachy. It presents case studies to illustrate real-world points. It also includes a backstage pass in each chapter with action items for putting the ideas into immediate practice.

Listen

The main takeaway is to listen to your customers. In your case, listen to your readers. Listen to what they engage with the most, what excites them, and give them more of that. If they rave about the way you describe your characters, repeat it in your next book. Don’t try to make your book appeal to all readers – the only people you need to please are your fans. Fans attract more fans.

Cultivate Fans

One specific idea for cultivating fans includes giving them an identity. For example, Fiskars® calls their website/forum members Fiskateers®. One of my author-friends has a series of books called the Greyhound Lady Walking series; she could call her fans the Greyhound Walkers (if she wanted to).

Take care of your fans. If someone takes the time to praise your book on social media, respond and thank them. Make your fans feel special. Give them backstage or insider information that only those who follow you on social media get to see. Do something special for them like hold a contest related to your book, perhaps a video, essay, poem, or writing prompt contest.

Let some of your trusted fans be beta readers. They already know and like your work so they can tell you exactly what works and doesn’t for your target audience; plus being a part of the product might make them want to tell their friends and family about their work, increasing readership.

Bad Reviews

Most of the advice in Think Like a Rock Star apply perfectly to book marketing, except for one. For brands other than books, responding (and empathizing with) negative comments is important. If you liken a negative comment to a negative review about your book, I believe it’s important to not respond. It’s especially important to not defend your book. If someone mentions a typo, respond, say thank you, and that it will be corrected in future editions. If someone has a problem with receiving an order or a book arrives badly printed, of course, respond and make it right, sending them a copy from your inventory if you need to, even if they ordered from a third-party vendor. However, if someone simply says they didn’t like your book or criticizes your writing, do not respond. Everyone is entitled to their opinion and the fact is, not everyone is going to like your book or writing.

Trolls

What if it’s a troll, you ask? Yes, you occasionally see a reviewer who simply likes to give scathing reviews for fun. It’s mean. But your true fans are not going to care. And most readers are intelligent enough to determine when someone is just being mean-spirited and when someone is giving a thoughtful review. If a reader is going to believe such crap and avoid your book because of it, is that the type of reader you want anyway? If someone’s really out to get you and posts numerous such reviews, you need more help than I can provide in this post (and I’m going to assume that’s not going to happen). If you’re really lucky, your true fans will respond to the review for you, singing your praises. Most likely, though, you will have several positive reviews which will negate the bad review. Plus, people get suspicious if a book has 100% 5-star reviews, so it might actually make your overall rating more credible.

This is just a small sampling of general marketing principles you can apply to your book in Think Like a Rock Star. If you enjoy marketing in general, need to learn about using social media, or if book marketing is one of the things you like most about being an author, this would be a good read.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. What would it be like if you were a book-star? If you are a book-star, tell me how you made it happen (please)! Do you have additional ideas for cultivating fans?

Just pop in a comment below.

2 thoughts on “THINK LIKE A BOOK STAR FOR BOOK MARKETING”

  1. Hi Jodie! Thanks for reading Think Like a Rock Star, I’m glad you enjoyed it and thrilled you got some ideas for your own book marketing. You made a great point about bad reviews for books being a bit different than bad product reviews because book reviews are far more subjective. For example, I really made an effort to include a lot of step-by-step instructions in TLARS because I knew that so many social media books will tell you WHY you should do something but won’t tell you HOW to do it. So I made sure I did in TLARS, but sure enough the first 3-star review on Amazon for the book said that there wasn’t enough step-by-step instruction. I wanted to pull my hair out, but you can’t please everyone!

    Have a great weekend!

    1. Thanks for commenting! So true about not pleasing everyone. Someone who doesn’t like rock music isn’t going to become a fan of a rock star, no matter how hard the rock star tries; better to please current and potential fans. Have a great weekend, too!

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